August 17, 2014

lostinurbanism:

Schools for the Colored by Wendel White 


     ”These photographs depict the buildings and landscapes that were associated with the system of racially segregated schools established at the southern boundaries of the northern United States. This area, sometimes referred to as “Up-South,” encompasses the northern “free” states that bordered the slave states. Schools for the Colored is the representation the duality of racial distinction within American culture.

The “veil” (the digital imaging technique of obscuring the landscape surrounding the schools) is a representation of DuBois’ concept, informing the visual narrative in these photographs. Some of the images depict sites where the original structure is no longer present. As a placeholder, I have inserted silhouettes of the original building or what I imagine of the appearance of the original building. The architecture and geography of America’s educational Apartied, in the form of a system of “colored schools,” within the landscape of southern New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois is the central concern of this project.”

(via photographsonthebrain)

August 16, 2014
free-parking:

Bill Viola — Heaven and Earth, video installation, 1992

The exposed tubes of two black and white video monitors are positioned facing each other, separated by a few inches and mounted at the ends of two wood columns that extend from the floor and ceiling respectively. The upper monitor shows video footage of the artist’s mother on her deathbed and the lower monitor shows the face of his newborn son only days old. Since the glass surface of each monitor reflects the image on the opposing screen, the birth-face and the death-face appear simultaneously as layered reflections within each other’s image. (via)

free-parking:

Bill Viola — Heaven and Earth, video installation, 1992

The exposed tubes of two black and white video monitors are positioned facing each other, separated by a few inches and mounted at the ends of two wood columns that extend from the floor and ceiling respectively. The upper monitor shows video footage of the artist’s mother on her deathbed and the lower monitor shows the face of his newborn son only days old. Since the glass surface of each monitor reflects the image on the opposing screen, the birth-face and the death-face appear simultaneously as layered reflections within each other’s image. (via)

(via 2headedsnake)

July 21, 2014

My photo of Areni Agbabian was in the New York Times this weekend. Here’s a link to the online version if you missed it.

July 18, 2014
tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1850, [daguerreotype portrait of an eagle]
via the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, ‘In the Looking Glass’ Exhibition

tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1850, [daguerreotype portrait of an eagle]

via the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, ‘In the Looking Glass’ Exhibition

July 18, 2014
free-parking:

Fragment of the face of a queen, yellow jasper, c. 1353–1336 B.C. Middle Egypt

free-parking:

Fragment of the face of a queen, yellow jasper, c. 1353–1336 B.C. Middle Egypt

(via cavetocanvas)

July 17, 2014

likeafieldmouse:

Zachary Norman - Exotic Matter (2014)

July 15, 2014

I’m working on a project call The Intentional Object.

    Phenomenology is the philosophical study of “phenomena”, or rather, the structures of experience and consciousness. These phenomena are called intentional objects. In plain terms, the intentional object is something that is not seen, but experienced, and is a response to the way in which a person processes the world around them.

     The Intentional Object is an experiment in making visible an aesthetic process that is typically invisible. It’s a known fact that most images are retouched. This is nothing revolutionary; however, can you pinpoint the methods of which that where effected? The artifice of the work is that which is unseen, it’s the invisible which shapes our understanding of the world around us, as well as, without saying a word, communicates social constructs about what we believe to be beautiful. As a staple to contemporary photography, I’m looking to take retouching out of it’s normal contexts (fashion, beauty, and advertising photography) and highlight it not as an accessory to a output, but a focal point. What happens when the intentions of the image have changed; when retouching is the desired result and the original content is a means to that end? I’m interested in the formal qualities of this specific process while reimagining the physical form and what it means to make a photograph.

 

July 6, 2014
zeroing:

Raluca Avramut

zeroing:

Raluca Avramut

(via 2headedsnake)

July 6, 2014
pursuable:

Jakob HunosoeYellow Bags, 2007From the series Full Moon Mirror

pursuable:

Jakob Hunosoe
Yellow Bags, 2007
From the series Full Moon Mirror

(via meetmeinchatroulette)

June 30, 2014

likeafieldmouse:

Shannon Finley